66th Ohio soldier Aaron Riker’s account of the battle at Cedar Mountain

It’s always our pleasure to meet visitors whose ancestors were at the Battle of Cedar Mountain. The July 20 tour group led by board member Brad Forbush included descendants of soldiers serving with the 42nd Virginia and 66th Ohio regiments. Tour participant Ivars Peterson is connected by marriage to Aaron Riker, a soldier who served with the 66th Ohio in the commissary department supporting troop supplies. Mr. Peterson shared his post-tour blog entry that includes an excerpt specific to Cedar Mountain from Aaron Riker’s wartime diary and photos from the July tour.

Read the blog entry

Aaron Riker of the 66th Ohio

Please note: Descendants who submit an ancestor form may have their ancestors honored during a recognition ceremony at our annual commemoration of the battle in August.

Annual battle commemoration & living history event

Valley Guards, 10th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Cedar Mountain
Photo by Buddy Secor, Ninja Pix

Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield will present the Cedar Mountain 157th Anniversary Living History Weekend on August 10 and 11, 2019. The event is free and open to all ages. Visitors will be able to choose from a variety of immersive activities designed to share the stories of Civil War soldiers and civilians before, during, and after the battle, the bloodiest day in Culpeper’s history.

The event commemorating the August 9, 1862 battle will be held at the battlefield along James Madison Highway/Route 15 south of Culpeper at 9465 General Winder Road. Parking will be available at the George Washington Carver Center, located at 9433 James Madison Highway/Route 15 near the battlefield. Shuttle buses will transport visitors every 15 minutes.

SCHEDULE

Saturday, August 10

11:00 am Opening shot, followed by combined arms demonstration (infantry and artillery).

1:00 pm School of the soldier. Open to the public, this session offers the opportunity to experience the life of a Civil War soldier by participating in basic drill and instruction; working with the infantry and learning how to handle a musket; learning how to march, drill and fight; and even serving on a gun crew.

3:00 pm Combined arms demonstration (infantry and artillery).

5:00 pm Camp life. Camps open to the public.

7:00 pm Ancestors’ Ceremony presented by Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield. A recognition of the fallen at Cedar Mountain whose names have been submitted to the Friends of Cedar Mountain Ancestors Roll by their descendants.

8:00 pm Torchlight tours of the camps and battlefield. ($5/adult, students free; fee supports battlefield preservation efforts)

Sunday, August 11

10:00 am Combined arms demonstration (infantry and artillery).

12:00 pm School of the soldier. Open to the public, this session offers the opportunity to experience the life of a Civil War soldier by participating in basic drill and instruction; working with the infantry and learning how to handle a musket; learning how to march, drill and fight; and even serving on a gun crew.

Questions about the event? Contact Friends of Cedar Mountain at info@friendsofcedarmountain.org

Civil War exhibit at new Carver 4-County Museum

While at Cedar Mountain, please consider a visit to the new Carver 4-County Museum, located in the Carver Center that is hosting parking for the battlefield living history event. More than 200 African American men from the counties of Culpeper, Rappahannock, Madison and Orange left their homes to join on the side of the Union during the Civil War.  Their Sacrifice: Our Freedom, an exhibit curated for the Carver 4-County Museum, highlights some of those men.   Visitors to the museum will view original Civil War artifacts and read of soldiers’ devastating experiences documented from actual pension files.    Exhibit time:  10:00 am to 4:00 pm, Saturday and Sunday, August 10-11, 2019.

For more information about the museum and the exhibit, please contact carver4cm@gmail.com.

Monuments at Cedar Mountain Battlefield

Contributed by Friends of Cedar Mountain board member Brad Forbush

Many visitors are surprised to learn there are five monuments on the Cedar Mountain battlefield. All but one of the battlefield monuments are on private property, which must be respected. The monuments honor the 3rd Wisconsin, the 27th Indiana, the 46th Pennsylvania, the 28th New York and the 10th Maine Infantry regiments.

These monuments are not to be confused with the Grimsley markers that dot the preserved portion of the battlefield. The Grimsley markers are small blocks of stone stamped with a brigade name, or the name of an artillery battery, that marked certain positions of units that participated in the fight. These became a nuisance to the local farmers whose land they occupied, causing them to be moved to less inconvenient sites. Many of the surviving stones have been collected for viewing and placed on the preserved part of the battlefield called “the point.” Others are still positioned near their original placement on the part of the battlefield that is protected.

Grimsley markers visible in front of the interpretative sign, with Cedar Mountain in the distance

In the far corner of the battlefield stands an impressive monument to the 3rd Wisconsin. It is accessible to all visitors willing to make the trek. The monument is engraved with the following names:

LIEUT. COL. L. H. D. CRANE.
CAPT. MOSES O’BRIEN.
CO. A DAVID BUCHTERKERCHEN.
C. FREDERICK EDDY.
J.C. LARIMORE.
GEO. MAXWELL.
C. DAVID ROUKE.
ANSON W. LOVELACE.
FRED G. REAGER.
ISAAC W. WINANS.
D. CURTIS JACOBS.
WESLEY J. BUTTS.
E. ETHAN W. BUTLER.
ANDREW CRAIGO.
FRANK DARLIN.
H. WM. H. MASON
NICOLAS WALLACE.
I. W.M. H. HUBBELL.
PETER JENSON.
EDWIN E. POLLEY.
JOHN. O. LYMAN.
CHAS. S. CURTIS.

On the base:
THIRD WIS. INFTY.
ERECTED BY THE SURVIVORS
1906.

Monument to the 3rd Wisconsin

Up in the woods on private land stand 3 other monuments fairly close together: the 27th Indiana, The 46th Pennsylvania, and the 28th New York.

The 27th Indiana reported 50 casualties: 15 killed, 29 wounded, 6 prisoners or missing. The monument to the 27th Indiana reads:

27TH INDIANA
INFANTRY.

Monument to the 27th Indiana

Of their 244 casualties, the 46th Pennsylvania reported 31 killed, 102 wounded, and 111 taken prisoner or mission. The inscription on the 46th Pennsylvania monument reads:

46 PENN. INF.
AUG. 19, 1862
CHARGED ACROSS
WHEAT FIELD AGAINST
STONEWALL JACKSON’S
COMMAND.
ENGAGED, 524
LOSS, 244

Monument to the 46th Pennsylvania

Reported casualties for the 28th New York included 21 killed, 79 wounded and 113 taken prisoner or missing, for a total of 213 casualties. The monument inscription reads:

28TH REG’T
NEW YORK STATE
VOLUNTEER
INFANTRY
AUG. 9, 1862
ERECTED 1902

Monument to the 28th New York

Some sightseers have spotted the monument to the 10th Maine while driving along route 15. It skirts the edge of a woods north of Dove Hill Road and the battlefield proper. Its often visible in the Winter if you know where to look. It is sometimes mistaken for a headstone, and some visitors have asked, who is buried there in the woods? But it is not a grave marker. It is the monument to the 10th Maine situated on the ground that represents the center of their line during the regiment’s ordeal in the famous wheatfield. The front of the marker reads:

TENTH MAINE
AUGUST 9, 1862.
26 OFFICERS
435 ENLISTED MEN

On the reverse side it reads:

LOSS 179
OFFICERS MEN
KILLED 3 36
WOUNDED 4 130
PRISONERS 1 5

Monument to the 10th Maine

The Civil War in Culpeper and Fauquier Counties

The Upper Rappahannock River Mapping Project: The Civil War in Culpeper and Fauquier Counties, 1862-1864 documents the broad and complex historical landscape that extends across much of Virginia’s Culpeper and Fauquier Counties, anchored along the Rappahannock River. During 1862-1864, nine battle engagements – including Cedar Mountain – took place in this area, and its strategic importance during the Civil War is supported by this report’s in-depth analysis that includes a wealth of current resources as well as historic photos and maps. An excellent resource for anyone interested in learning more about the historical landscape of Culpeper and Fauquier Counties.

Click on the image below to read the full report on issuu.com