Capt. E. A. Bowen, Part 3; With the 151st NY at Payne’s Farm

I want to thank Mary Robinson, descendant of Captain Erwin Ambrose Bowen, for the biographical materials on her Great-Great Grandfather which is presented in this series of posts.

Captain Erwin A. Bowen was paroled from Libby Prison at Aiken’s Landing in Richmond, on September 13, 1862. At Washington, D.C. on the 17th, he secured fifteen days leave of absence and started for home on the 5 p.m. train. That leave would extend to October 2nd. On October 1st Captain Bowen mustered out of the 28th New York Volunteers. On October 31st, Lieutenant-Colonel Bowen mustered into the newly minted 151st New York Volunteers, a 3 year regiment.

Continue reading “Capt. E. A. Bowen, Part 3; With the 151st NY at Payne’s Farm”

Capt. Erwin A. Bowen, Part 2; Libby Prison

Captain Bowen’s great-great-granddaughter shared this manuscript of her ancestor’s service so that it could be posted here.  These soldiers’ personal stories, from both sides of the battle, are what makes our battlefield history so compelling.

In 1858 Erwin Bowen married Anna Beach. He was then a lieutenant in the New York State Militia. On September 25, 1860, a daughter Effie, was born. She would be the first of 4 children. In the following letter, Captain Bowen, writes to his wife about his experiences at the Battle of Cedar Mountain and as a captured prisoner of war following the engagement. Towards the end of the letter, he records the passing of his young daughter’s 2nd birthday, while he was still held captive as a prisoner of war in Richmond. Here is the captain’s story in his own words.


Continue reading “Capt. Erwin A. Bowen, Part 2; Libby Prison”

Capt. Erwin Ambrose Bowen, 28th NY; Part 1: Introduction

I want to thank Captain Bowen’s  great-great-granddaughter, Mary Robinson for helping me share her ancestor’s story, presented here in several parts, of which this is the first. 

The 28th New York Volunteers lost heavily at the Battle of Cedar Mountain.#1 It was the defining episode of the regiment’s two year history, and they memorialized it in writings, battlefield monuments and veteran re-unions. The story of Captain Erwin A. Bowen figures prominently amidst these engaging human interest stories.

Continue reading “Capt. Erwin Ambrose Bowen, 28th NY; Part 1: Introduction”

More on Judge Grimsley: Dedication of the 28th NY Monument

To continue with Judge Daniel A. Grimsley’s efforts to memorialize the Cedar Mountain Battlefield, two more news clippings are presented here.  These document his successful efforts to coordinate brotherly reunions between the veteran soldiers of the Blue and the Gray.   In this instance the occasion was the dedication of the 28th New York Monument in the Culpeper National Cemetery, August 9,  1902.

Continue reading “More on Judge Grimsley: Dedication of the 28th NY Monument”

No. 7. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams.

No. 7.

Report of Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, Second Corps.

Hdqrs. First Div., Second Corps, Army of Virginia,       
Near Cedar Run, Va., August  16, 1862.

      Major:   I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division under my command in the action at this place on the 9th instant:

      My division, since the transfer of Geary’s brigade, is composed of the brigade commanded by Brigadier-General Crawford  (Twenty-eighth New York, Colonel Donnelly;  Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe;  Tenth Maine, Colonel Beal, and Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman), and of the Third Brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General Gordon (Third Wisconsin, Colonel Ruger;  Second Massachusetts, Colonel Andrews, and Twenty-seventh Indiana, Colonel Colgrove). Continue reading “No. 7. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams.”

No. 8. Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford.

No.  8.

Report of Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade.

Hdqrs. First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps,        
Army of Virginia, August  14, 1862.

      Major:    I have the honor to submit the following report of the operation of the force under my command in the recent engagement with the rebel forces near Cedar Mountain, Va.: Continue reading “No. 8. Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford.”

No. 28. Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson.

No. 28.

Reports of Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, C.S. Army, commanding Valley District, with congratulations from General R. E. Lee.

Near Locust Dale,  August 9, 1862.

      General:   I am not making much progress.  The enemy’s cavalry yesterday and last night also threatened my train.  Eight of their number, including 3 officers, were captured by Colonel Flournoy yesterday.  None were captured last night so far as heard. Continue reading “No. 28. Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson.”

Monuments at Cedar Mountain Battlefield

Contributed by Friends of Cedar Mountain board member Brad Forbush

Many visitors are surprised to learn there are five monuments on the Cedar Mountain battlefield. All but one of the battlefield monuments are on private property, which must be respected. The monuments honor the 3rd Wisconsin, the 27th Indiana, the 46th Pennsylvania, the 28th New York and the 10th Maine Infantry regiments. Continue reading “Monuments at Cedar Mountain Battlefield”